The changing of the workplace in the economy of today

In the last fiscal year, government agencies received 5, charges alleging pregnancy discrimination in the workplace. The most common complaint? Employers fired them because they became pregnant. For the first time in 30 years, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission issued new guidance on how to interpret the PDA and other laws protecting pregnant women on the job.

The changing of the workplace in the economy of today

Women still get fired simply because they're pregnant. In the last fiscal year, government agencies received 5, charges alleging pregnancy discrimination in the workplace. The most common complaint? Employers fired them because they became pregnant. It's been illegal to discriminate against pregnant women in the workplace since the Pregnancy Discrimination Act was passed in Apparently, a lot of employers still don't understand that, so last week, a government agency decided to issue a reminder.

For the first time in 30 years, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission issued new guidance on how to interpret the PDA and other laws protecting pregnant women on the job.

Here's what you need to know. An employer cannot fire a woman because she's pregnant: Sometimes, employers try to disguise the discrimination behind good intentions. They explain they're worried about safety, for example. In other cases, the discrimination is more blatant.

Either way, it's illegal. Take this example from a wings restaurant chain in the Houston-area. The company had a written policy to lay off female workers after the third month of their pregnancies. A federal investigation showed the company laid off eight pregnant employees. A manager told investigators that keeping pregnant employees at work any longer would "be irresponsible in respect to her child's safety.

Exceptions are rare, even when a job entails being exposed to toxic chemicals or lifting heavy objects. Courts have ruled that decisions about the safety of the woman and fetus are up to the employee and her doctor, not her boss.

Women still get fired simply because they're pregnant.

A company cannot refuse to hire a woman because she's pregnant -- or because she may become pregnant in the future: App can help you get pregnant This problem occurs even at companies that rely on pregnant women as their customers.

It's also illegal to not hire a woman because she may become pregnant in the future. New mothers have the right to pump breast milk at work in a safe place.

A company cannot fire or discriminate against a woman because she's lactating: You can thank Obamacare for this protection. The Affordable Care Act requires employers provide reasonable breaks to new mothers to pump breast milk for up to one year after a child's birth.

Employers are also required to provide a safe and private place other than a bathroom, to do so.

Americans who find meaning in these four areas have higher life satisfaction

But there is an exception for small companies. If a company with fewer than 50 employees can prove that offering breaks or a private space would cause "undue hardship" to the company, it may not have to offer this accommodation to their employees. In some cases, pregnancy-related conditions may entitle women to special accommodations: A normal pregnancy without complications is not considered a disability under federal law, and it does not entitle a worker to special treatment.

That said, women who have complications or temporary impairments related to their pregnancy, must be treated the same as other workers with medical impairments. Dad stays home while Mom pays the bills If a company has a policy in place that, for example, offers a light-duty assignment for a few months to a worker who injured his back, the company is also expected to provide "reasonable accommodations" to a pregnant woman who requires light-duty due to her pregnancy.

Stay-at-home moms are on the rise Other examples of reasonable accommodations may include letting a worker sit on a stool rather than stand during her shift, changing her work schedule if she has severe morning sickness, or allowing her to keep a water bottle at her work station.

The worker usually needs to provide a doctor's note, establishing there's a medical condition that may temporarily limit her work capabilities. In the case of a pregnancy, common impairments include severe morning sickness, back pain, high blood pressure, gestational diabetes and complications that require bed rest.

There are some exceptions, but again, to avoid providing an accommodation, an employer has to prove that doing so would cause "undue hardship" to the company.

An employer cannot force you to take time off or change jobs, if you're still able to do your job: Sometimes an employer thinks they're acting in the best interest of the employee -- or protecting itself from liabilities -- when it decides to reassign a pregnant woman or new parent to a less strenuous job.

The Changing Facet Of Aviation Training - The Digital Innovation

Employers cannot base employment decisions on assumptions about pregnant women's capabilities and health concerns. For example, a boss cannot prevent a pregnant worker from traveling on business trips, because he's concerned about her health. A company cannot deny a pregnant woman a promotion, assuming once she returns to work after childbirth, she will be less committed to her job.

Employers also cannot reassign workers to less desirable jobs, even temporarily, due to concerns about a pregnancy. That can still be viewed as discrimination," said Tracy Billows, a partner at Seyfarth Shawspecializing in labor and employment law. Non-medical leave must be equally available to both women and men:The so-called “gig economy” is a polarizing topic.

On one hand, companies such as Uber and Airbnb have helped to make significant improvements in the lives of consumers by using new technology to rethink old business models. Aug 15,  · "The way people can work in offices today is changing in front of our eyes, this opens up new possibilities for encouraging creativity and innovation as the days of office work focusing purely on.

Aug 15,  · "The way people can work in offices today is changing in front of our eyes, this opens up new possibilities for encouraging creativity and innovation as the . Zeitz Workplace Lawyers (ZWL) provides advice and representation to employers on all industrial and workplace relations matters including: Employment law and dismissals, industrial relations, occupational health and safety and workers compensation laws, equal opportunity and discrimination laws, and protecting and enforcing intellectual property .

Sep 13,  · On Leadership “When you look at Millennials, in particular, in the workplace, they have an underlying desire to shape where they work; to make a contribution, to see that the role they play has.

The changing of the workplace in the economy of today

SIOP Announces Top 10 Workplace Trends for 12/20/ -. by SIOP Administrative Office The Workplace Continues to Rapidly Change, Data Is Still Big, .

8 rights of pregnant women at work