An examination of aristotles definition of tragedy on the example of the play macbeth

Hardison Certified Educator This is an interesting question and one that is a little difficult to answer because the Renaissance tragic hero--the Shakespearean tragic hero--took on some aspects that were rather different from the aspects defining the Aristotelian tragic hero.

An examination of aristotles definition of tragedy on the example of the play macbeth

The three elements from the Greek are hamartia, peripeteia, and anagnorisis, and all are present in Shakespeare's Macbeth. In terms of Macbeth, Macbeth's tragic flaw is "vaulting ambition," or ambition that cannot be stopped; rather it trips According to Aristotle, there are three elements that make a story a tragedy.

An examination of aristotles definition of tragedy on the example of the play macbeth

In terms of MacbethMacbeth's tragic flaw is "vaulting ambition," or ambition that cannot be stopped; rather it trips over itself so that the character can, in this case, move up in the world. To prick the sides of my intent, but only Vaulting ambition, which o'erleaps itself, And falls on th'other.

The last element of tragedy, according to Aristotle is when the main character has something like an epiphany: In this case, it occurs when Macbeth finally realizes that the witches' have led him to his doom, when all of the seemingly impossible "caveats" in their predictions actually occur. It looks like Birnham Wood is moving to Dunsinane Hill.

Amid these three elements, Macbeth is also a tragic hero. Aristotle defines the tragic hero as a "great" important man; he dies due to his tragic flaw; and, his death is his own fault. Macbeth is a great man: He has fought like a lion on the battlefield for his King.

Macbeth dies because of his tragic flaw: He tries to be happy with all that Duncan has given him—the rewards and the honors. He tells Lady Macbeth he does not want to continue in their plot to kill the King, who Macbeth truly loves and admires.

Lady Macbeth insults his manhood, and Macbeth gives in to her nagging and his ambitious nature, and ultimately, he dies. His death is his own fault because he does not ignore the witches' predictions—as does Banquo —and he gives in to his wife's desires, allowing her to manipulate him when he really does not want to commit regicide; however, she wants to be queen.

And so, Macbeth is a tragedy by Aristotle's definition, and Macbeth a tragic hero as well.By Aristotle's definition, the tragic hero infused the audience with fear and pity while, in the resolution, the catharsis of the drama (Aristotelian dramatic catharsis:the reasonable and natural.

Dec 20,  · Looking at each play and keeping Aristotle’s thoughts in mind, all three can be placed in the genre of tragedy.

Aristotle’s definition of tragedy in the Poetics is quite long and detailed. In summary, it states that a tragedy is an imitation of action and Reviews: 4. One such standard is the Aristotelian definition of tragedy and the tragic hero. William Shakespeare’s The Tragedy of Macbeth is a perfect mold of an Aristotelian Tragedy.

It displays all eight aspects of Aristotle’s definition of tragedy. It is set mainly in Scotland, but briefly in England during the eleventh century. In Shakespeare’s tragic play, Macbeth, the character of Macbeth is consistent with Aristotle's definition of the tragic hero.

Aristotle's tragic hero is a man who is characterized by good and evil. He is a mixture of good characteristics and bad characteristics. For example, Macbeth was an honorable Thane of Glamis. Shakespeares Macbeth is an exemplary form of Aristotles definition of tragedy.

Macbeth, on par with Oedipus and Medea, begins the play on a noble pedestal, but, before the eyes of the viewers, loses the battle with his destiny, and degrades from a hero to a butcher by its denouement.

According to Aristotle, there are three elements that make a story a tragedy.

An examination of aristotles definition of tragedy on the example of the play macbeth

The three elements (from the Greek) are hamartia, peripeteia, and anagnorisis, and all are present in Shakespeare's.

Tragedy In Macbeth